Wednesday, April 16, 2014

CVGS Research Trip to San Diego Public Library on 23 April 2014

While we can’t exactly call it our “New” Downtown San Diego Library any longer, it is still new to some of us. If you haven’t been, now’s your chance! We are planning a field trip on Wednesday, April 23rd and will go as a group on the Trolley, meeting at the Chula Vista E Street station at about 11:20 a.m.  

We’ll take the Blue Line (to America Plaza), disembarking at the Park and Market stop, then walk less than two blocks south to the Library. We plan to meet for our tour at the Library’s main entrance shortly after it opens at noon.   If you choose to drive, please remember that parking is free for only two hours (with a library card), and after that it is $1.25 for every 20 minutes (!). 

John Finch is arranging a tour for us of the ninth floor genealogy collection, and we may also have a tour of the rest of the Library as well – there is so much to see!  

 To sign up, please contact Karen Yarger (khy13@hotmail.com ) or John Finch (jan27@cox.net). We will send you further instructions and some tips on what to bring, etc., a few days before departure. Here’s your first tip: The Trolley’s senior fare is only $1.25 – do not buy your return ticket at the same time, since the tickets are only valid for two hours. 

We will probably leave the library about 5 p.m., so there will be plenty of time for some genealogy research. On Wednesdays, the Library closes at 8 p.m., so you may stay as late as you like. For more information on the Library, see http://www.sandiegolibrary.org, or call them at 619-236-5800. 

Karen Yarger wrote this article.

Monday, April 14, 2014

CVGS Newsletter - April 2014

The April 2014 issue of the Chula Vista Genealogical Society (CVGS) Newsletter was published last week.  You can read it online, in a PDF format - use the Newsletter link at www.CVGenealogy.org.



The Table of Contents lists:

page 1 - April 30th Program Meeting 
page 2 - President’s Message
page 2 - Library Committee Report
page 3 - Spring Seminar Program Review
page 4 - Spring Seminar Wrap-Up


page 5 - "The Orphan Trains" Article

page 5 - Southern California Genealogy Jamboreepage 6 - Next Computer Group Meeting
page 6 - Next Research Group Meetingpage 6 - April 23rd Genealogy Research Trip

page 6 - Lemon Grove Research Group News
page 7 - May 3rd Workshop
page 7 - March Program Review
page 8 - "Shaking the Family Tree" Family History Fair
page 9 - CVGS Society Information 

page 9 - San Diego Genealogy Events 
page 10 - Genealogy Days in Chula Vista



Sunday, April 13, 2014

CVGS Computer Group Meeting is 16 April 2014

The next Chula Vista Genealogical Society Computer Group Meeting is on Wednesday, 16 April 2014, from 12 noon to 2 p.m. at the Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library (365 F Street in Chula Vista) in the Library Conference Room, led by Shirley Becker.

Bring your laptops for hands-on use of the library's wifi system.  For more information, please contact Shirley Becker (clanroots@cox.net).

Friday, April 11, 2014

April 9th Research Group Meeting Review

The April Research Group Meeting of the Chula Vista Genealogical Society had 21 in attendance at the Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library.

In the first hour, Karen Yarger and Diane Godinez made several announcements, and then Randy Seaver discussed how to access and use the FamilySearch record collections, since only some of them are indexed, and some are not indexed.  The latter must be browsed, and there are many "genealogy gems" hiding in those unindexed collections, including probate and land records for several states.  He used New York Probate Records as an example, and demonstrated finding the "waypoints" and locating a specific record in a digitized book of Estate papers for one of his ancestors.  He also highlighted the www.CreateFan.com website to create a number of colorful and useful family tree charts based on information from the FamilySearch Family Tree.

In the second hour, research questions and problems were posed and addressed by group members.  For instance:

*  Laura asked how she should try to find her ancestor, James Craft (1810-1880), who moved from Maryland to Pennsylvania to Illinois to Iowa during his lifetime.  She has only census records for 1850 to 1870, and cannot find his parents.  The group suggested identifying the places that he lived and looking for military, land, church, cemetery, tax and probate records on microfilm or on FamilySearch.

*  Sally is just starting her research, and a family story is that James Russell was a Revolutionary War soldier, and she wanted to know how to prove that.  The group recommended that she confirm her ancestral line back to him by working backwards, using vital, census, military and other records, family by family.  For Revolutionary War soldiers, the DAR has a useful database, there should be a Compiled Military Service Record for the soldier, and there may be a pension file for him.  

*  Jane is also starting her research, and has been working on FamilySearch.  She wondered if she should invest in subscriptions for Ancestry.com and Archives.com.  The group suggested that she should use the free sites, including Rootsweb.com, USGenWeb.org, FindaGrave.com and the Rootsweb WorldConnect family tree database, to find more leads before investing in a subscription site.  She also asked about immigration sites, and the group suggested EllisIsland.org, CastleGarden.org and FamilySearch, and that Ancestry.com had passenger lists for all ports in their collection.

*  Shirley bought some of the Rhode Island Roots periodicals at the book sale at the CVGS seminar and has found some helpful items for her ancestor, Samuel Tillinghast.  

*  Helen asked if some one with the first names of "Ayres Marie" could be an "Iris Marie" in other records.  The group thought so.  She said that autosomal DNA tests show a possible cousin has an "Iris" in their tree.

*  Hazel wondered how accurate FamilySearch Family Tree data is.  The group thought that form any families in the 19th and 20th century, the information was accurate since it was based on family papers and genealogical research.  When you get back into the 18th century and before, the information may not be as accurate because of the lack of records and duplicate entries for persons and events.

*  Bobbie displayed the 150th Anniversary book for her local church in Lake County, Illinois, which has articles submitted by descendants and members, including her own.  This is an example of what you might find at local libraries and historical societies when you visit an ancestral location.  
The next meeting of the CVGS Research Group will be on Wednesday, 14 May 2014 at 12 noon in the Conference Room at the Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library.  


Monday, April 7, 2014

April 5th Saturday Workshop Review =- New York Research

The April 5th Saturday Workshop meeting of the Chula Vista Genealogical Society at the Bonita-Sunnyside Library featured two discussions about "New York Research."


In the first hour, CVGS Member Shirley Becker provided a historical overview of New York, along with a discussion of county formation and record jurisdictions during the colonial and early statehood periods.  She was born in New York and has worked on her family history for over twenty years, and has done extensive research at the local, county and state level.  

Perhaps the most important concept is record jurisdiction - the state, county and towns or cities have unique records, and it is important to understand where to find specific records.  Then there are villages and hamlets.  In their early history, counties often divided into several smaller counties, and original towns often divided into several more smaller towns, so knowing when  counties and towns were formed is critical.  Each town has a town historian who should know what town records are available, and where they can be accessed.  
In the second hour, CVGS Member Randy Seaver provided a quick look at online resources for New York genealogical research.  He visited and demonstrated use of these websites (and his handout had many more links to online resources):

*   New York Wikipedia article  for basic history and demographic information

*  Cyndi's List page for New York for links to New York resources

*  FamilySearch Research Wiki for New York State for information about New York genealogy

*   FamilySearch List of Online New York Resources with links for New York online databases 

*  Family History Library Catalog to search for place names

*  Ancestry.com Family History Wiki for New York 

*  Ancestry.com Card Catalog - put "new york" in the Title or Keyword fields

*  Steve Morse's One-Step Web Pages has N.Y. immigration and vital records

*  New York Land Records, 1630-1975 collection on FamilySearch - need to browse this collection.

*  New York Probate Records, 1629-1971 collection on FamilySearch - need to browse this collection.

*  U.S. Dutch Reformed Church Records, 1660-1926 collection on Ancestry.com has some church records.

Randy spent quite a bit of time explaining how to get to the actual records for the land and probate collections, since the collections are not indexed and must be browsed, using "waypoints" to find records for a specific person.  In general, the waypoints are the County and then a number of "books" in each county.  Index books can be used to find book volumes and page numbers for deeds or probate records, and then the specific volume needs to be searched to find the digital image with the specific page.  


Saturday, April 5, 2014

CVGS Spring Seminar Door Prize Winners

The CVGS Seminar Committee solicited door and opportunity drawing prizes from CVGS members, local businesses, and commercial genealogy companies.

The door prize winners were:

1)  National Institute for Genealogical Studies - one free course:  Marcia Mautner and Joann Bonner:


Marcia Mautner, CVGS President Virginia Taylor, Joann Bonner. 
(Photo courtesy of Karen Yarger)

2)  Mocavo Gold one-year subscription:  Jacquie Goodman

Note:  Two other Mocavo subscriptions were awarded to opportunity drawing winners.

3)  MyHeritage One-year Data and Tree Premium subscription:  Tim Williams

Note:  Two other MyHeritage subscriptions were awarded to opportunity drawing winners.

4)  Ancestry.com One-year World Explorer subscription:  Karen Smith


Karen Smith, CVGS President Virginia Taylor 
(Photo courtesy of Karen Yarger)

In addition, genealogical prizes were provided by:

*  FindMyPast one-year subscription and gift bag

*  GenealogyBank one year subscription

*  Geni.com one-year subscription

*  Legacy Family Tree Version 8 software from Millennium Corporation

*  RootsMagic family tree software and user guide from RootsMagic.

*  Family Tree Maker 2014 software provided by Ancestry.com

*   Family Tree Maker 2014 software provided by Randy Seaver

*  Tracing Your Colonial Ancestors magazine and InstaGuide

CVGS appreciates and thanks all of the prizes offered by all of the providers.  

Thursday, April 3, 2014

CVGS Spring Seminar Review - Jean and Butch Hibben

The Chula Vista Genealogical Society Spring Seminar was Saturday, 29 March 2014 at the Chula Vista Golf Course in Bonita, California.  The featured speakers, Jean Wilcox Hibben and her husband, Butch Hibben, provided the genealogy education and entertainment to 49 attendees.


Jean and Butch Hibben (photo courtesy of Karen Yarger)

Jean made four presentations during the day, including:

1)  "This is not Your Grandma's Genealogy: Making the Transition from Paper to Electronic Record-Keeping."  Jean noted that most researchers are putting their genealogical information on a computer in family trees, word-processing documents or spreadsheets.  Library card catalogs are online, and there is so much to learn.  She discussed why researchers should put their information on the computer, with pros and cons of using a computer to add and revise data, different storage devices, providing information to other researchers, using digital images, computer costs, different equipment (desktop computer, laptop, netbook, tablet, printers, scanners, cameras, smart phones, storage media, etc.).  Computer backup, cloud storage and retrieval sites were briefly covered.  

Jean recommended that genealogists should learn how to use their computers and devices to make their research efforts more efficient, using the programs and websites that you feel comfortable using and to advance at your own speed.  

Butch Hibben provided information about smart phone apps for genealogy available on iOS and Android devices, highlighting family tree apps (RootsMagic, GEDCOMGTG, Ancestry), Evernote (for notes, photos, audio), CamScanner (photos of documents), and Cloud Storage/Retrieval (Dropbox, SurDoc and Google Drive).

2)  "Elisabeth: The Story of a German Immigrant."  In this talk, Jean was in the character of her ancestor, Elisabetha Huberta Thenee Mueller Wolbert (1828-1895), and showed images of records and places from Germany and America.  Elisabetha was born in Rath, Germany, married to Thomas Mueller and had five children by him.  She was abused by her husband, and decided to migrate to America, without her children who were raised by her sister, before the Civil War, with a family friend named Philip Wolbert, and resided in New York, New Jersey and Illinois.  He served in the Civil War, and married Elisabetha after he returned.  Elisabetha was reunited with one of her children and died in the home of a daughter in Illinois.  This is an example of how a skillful genealogist and story-teller can weave facts and family stories, along with social and world history, into a narrative that describes one person's life.  The entire story of Elisabeth is available as an e-reader book at www.lulu.com/spotlight/circlemending.  

Jean's handout included an extensive list of helpful reference books and websites that were used to learn about German research, and to find the records she displayed from Germany and America.

3)  "Reality Television: A New Perspective."  Jean was the lead researcher for the PBS television series Genealogy Roadshow, which aired 23 September, 30 September, 7 October and 14 October 2013.  Each hour-long episode had about ten segments where the subject was brought into the set, and was showed documents to connect them to an event or famous person.  There were three on-air hosts - D. Joshua Taylor, Kenyatta Berry, and Emmett Miller.  

She hired four other researchers to help her during the 12 weeks  of research before shooting the four shows in Austin, Nashville, Detroit and San Francisco.   Three of the researchers worked 10 to 12 hours a day for three months on this project.  They researched the ancestry of about 150 different persons chosen in or near the four cities, and had to find the persons that had the "best" stories from a genealogy perspective.  As lead researcher, Jean had to deal with the show producers and staff, who knew virtually nothing about the genealogy research process.  The organization chart for the production changed frequently and they all needed some education about genealogy in order to make the show work for genealogy.  

Jean shared many conclusions drawn from this experience.  The most interesting, to me, was that they didn't plan on having to consider document image copyright protection, and used many Library of Congress photographs which are in the public domain.  The research staff had no control over editing the segments and several inconsistencies appeared on the show.  They used the Association of Professional Genealogists mailing list to solicit help retrieving documents and research help in distant places.  For some reason, the production staff did not find "farming" to be an interesting occupation.

4)  "Up Close and Personal Doing On-Site Research."  In this presentation, Jean highlighted effective ways to use the time available to conduct research in a distant location.  She broke the talk up into three segments:

*  Before the trip, the planning (dates, places, transportation), people and places to contact (genealogists, librarians, archivists, cemetery sextons, church offices, vital record offices, courthouses, Family History Centers, possible relatives or neighbors), and the things to pack (research papers and records, technology equipment, graveyard equipment, etc.).  She noted that some courthouses and archives don't allow cameras on site, that researchers should contact repositories and determine open days/hours, make appointments, and that they should visit cemeteries at the end of a day.

*  During the On-Site visits to historical and genealogical societies, vital records offices, courthouses, and churches, be sure to mind the establishment rules and be considerate of staff and patrons.  If visiting  ancestral homes or cemeteries, be sure to have permission to be on private property.  Visit tourist attractions to learn local history, take photographs of the area, meet residents, buy some postcards.

*  After the trip, organize and transcribe your notes, file your findings, name and catalog photographs and transfer them to your computer, send notes or reports to contacts, and make a list of what to do next time you visit each location.  

The entertainment portion of the program was after the served lunch, when Jean played her guitar and sang folk songs, and Butch accompanied her on the saw.  The audience was intrigued by the sounds created with the saw, and how Butch changed notes by bending the saw and running the bow in just the right place.  

This was a very successful seminar for CVGS and the attendees learned a lot.  


Wednesday, April 2, 2014

CVGS Saturday Workshop on "New York Research" on 5 April at Bonita

The Saturday, April 5th Workshop of the Chula Vista Genealogical Society is from 12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Bonita-Sunnyside Library (4375 Bonita Road, turn north at Billy Casper Way) in the Community Room.  

The discussion topic this month is "New York Research."  CVGS member Shirley Becker will briefly describe the colonial and state history of New York, and explain the different jurisdictions where genealogical records may be found.  CVGS member Randy Seaver will demonstrate finding New York genealogical resources online in the Family History Library Catalog, the FamilySearch Research Wiki, the FamilySearch Record collections, CyndisList, Ancestry Databases, and more.  

This workshop is free to attend.  The Bonita-Sunnyside Library has free wi-fi computer access, so bring your laptop or tablet to search for New York ancestors.


Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Genealogy Days in Chula Vista - April 2014

The Chula Vista Genealogical Society events for April 2014 include:

**  Saturday, 5 April, 12 noon to 3 p.m., Bonita-Sunnyside Library (4375 Bonita Road) -- Saturday Workshop:  Shirley Becker and Randy Seaver will lead a discussion on "New York Research."

** Wednesday 9 April, 12 noon to 2 p.m., Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library (365 F Street) -- CVGS Research Group meets in the Library Conference Room, led by Randy Seaver.  We will review the latest genealogy news, share success stories and information, and discuss members research problems, and potential solutions, based on the collective knowledge and wisdom of the group.  

** Wednesday, 16 April, 12 noon to 1:30 p.m., Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library (365 F Street) -- CVGS Computer Group meets in the Library Computer Lab, led by Shirley Becker. Bring your laptops to sharpen your computer skills and investigate online genealogy resources.

**  Wednesday, 23 April, 11 a.m. to afternoon, Research Trip to the San Diego Central Library.  Take the San Diego Trolley from E Street station to downtown San Diego ($1.25 each way for seniors).  The library opens at 12 noon.  The genealogy collection is on the 9th floor.  

** Wednesday, 30 April, 12 noon to 2 p.m., Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library (365 F Street) -- CVGS Program Meeting in the Auditorium.  Paul Erickson will present "The Orphan Train."  Refreshments before and after the meeting.

**  Wednesdays, 2, 9, 16 and 30 April, 10 a.m. to 12 noon, Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library (365 F Street) -- Research Assistance in the Family Research area.  John Finch will help you with your research problems.  Bring your laptop if you want to do online research.

The Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library is located at 365 "F" Street in Chula Vista - between Third Avenue and Fourth Avenue, midway between I-5 and I-805 (take the "E" Street exit from the freeways).

The Bonita-Sunnyside (County) Library is located at 4375 Bonita Road in Bonita - turn north on Billy Casper Way, just west of the Otay Lakes Road intersection with Bonita Road, on the north side of Bonita Road.

We welcome guests and visitors to our CVGS programs and events - if you are in the greater San Diego area and want to attend our events - please come and introduce yourselves.  All CVGS events are FREE to attend, except for some seminars and picnics.

Saturday, March 29, 2014

Spring Seminar on Saturday, 29 March, Features Jean Wilcox Hibben - Register Now!

It’s not as far away as you think! Our Spring Seminar is open for reservations and we have an interesting ‘menu’ planned for you. 

Please mark Saturday, March 29 on your calendar and plan to attend and learn all sorts of ways to improve your genealogy research, have some fun AND enjoy a catered lunch. We’ll have drawings for great prizes, vendors and expert speakers. Popular and knowledgeable Jean Hibben will offer four presentations, with additional talks by her husband Butch Hibben.



 Jean’s first talk will be “This is NOT Your Grandma's Genealogy: Making the Transition from Paper to Electronic Record-Keeping.” Are you a bit intimidated by the thought of organizing and storing all your research on the computer or ‘in the cloud’? Are you still stuck with boxes and boxes of paper? Jean will give you tips to convince you that modern technology is, indeed, your friend. She’ll discuss the advantages and disadvantages of computer over paper and will cover what to you need to know to transition away from total paper record keeping. Butch Hibben will discuss how to use Smart Phone technology for those interested in portable genealogy. He will also present his popular Living Legacy Project and be will be available throughout the day to share more information.

 The second morning session will be Jean’s presentation of Elisabeth: The Story of a German Immigrant. Jean’s novelization of her great great grandmother’s life is full of drama, love and history. Her narrative is a compelling picture of American history and will deal with topics such as the Civil War, law, and immigration.  The book will also be for sale at the seminar.

After lunch, Jean will present Lessons Learned from Genealogy Roadshow. Remember how the TV show made genealogical research look so easy? Jean shares with us how developing stories for a television show means having a minimum of time to gather together a wealth of family history, and how we can use those methods to make an interesting narrative of our family. How does one record lead to the next, and what alternate resources are available when one is unable to travel to other locations? 

Jean’s final presentation will be Up Close and Personal, a discussion of suggestions for doing research where our ancestors lived and died. This will include travel tips, hints for cemetery visits, contacting libraries and societies in advance, planning interviews of living relatives, and post-visit “debriefing” and organization. If there is time, attendees will be encouraged to share their personal experiences.

It will be an informative and entertaining day, so register now on our website (http://cvgenealogy.org/). You may pay by check or credit card - $45 for CVGS members, $50 for non-members – but there is a $5 discount if you register by March 8. 

So sign up now, before you forget! And remember, this is our big fundraiser for high school scholarships. We will have a drawing for a deluxe kitchen accessories basket too (have you bought your tickets yet?).   There will be door prizes and opportunity drawings also.

Come join us for our “Recipe for Genealogy” seminar!

Thursday, March 27, 2014

"Postcard Collections and Genealogy" Program Review

Carol Davidson Baird provided an enthusiastic and informative presentation on "Postcard Collections and Genealogy" at the March 26th monthly program meeting of the Chula Vista Genealogical Society to about 35 attendees.  See Carol's biography and talk summary in March 26th Program Meeting - Carol Baird on "Postcard Collections and Genealogy."



Carol started collecting postcards as an adult, and used postcards from her collection and experiences from her travels to illustrate hr presentation.

Topics covered included the purposes of postcards (communication, souvenirs, advertising, official notices); postcard subjects (e.g., buildings, famous art, ships, locations, advertisements, personal photos, etc.); history of postcards (from 1870s to the present); how to date postcards from postmarks, stamps, different paper types, card style, handwriting, images shown, printed legends, etc.

She also noted that you can learn about geography, history, customs, holidays, personal lives, and more from collecting postcards.  They are useful in genealogical research also (e.g., pictures of ancestral towns, ships on which your family emigrated, ancestral schools and places of worship) and perhaps have correspondence from family members and friends.

Carol used several postcards received by her family in Germany before and after World War II to illustrate some of the genealogical usefulness.  A researcher can add personal information to a biography from personal letters and information on postcards.  She provided a short genealogy case study derived from 13 postcards to a teenager in the 1908-1910 time frame that she found in a box of postcards at a collectors show.  Miss Mary B. Hyde was the recipient of romantic postcards from a number of young men.  Carol researched Mary Hyde, found her as a 17-year old in the 1910 U.S. Census in Los Angeles County with parents and siblings, and found an Ancestry Member Tree for her that showed she married a John Francis Delaney in about 1911, and had two daughters.  

She noted that sometimes serendipity happens - Carol found a card with a famous art painting of a nude woman sent from Spain in 1969 by her and her siblings to her uncle in Burbank.  She found it in a box of postcards for sale at an antiques store in the Los Angeles area. 

One of the audience questions was where a researcher might find postcards for their family or ancestral localities.  Carol said to look in home paper and photo collections, antique stores, stamp and coin shops, ephemera shows and county fairs, nursing homes, military bases and post exchanges, old friends, historical societies, and local libraries.

This was an interesting presentation for many of the attendees.  Some expressed dismay that they did not have any postcards from their parents or grandparents, and some lamented that they knew many postcards had been lost when their elders died and the heirs cleaned out the ancestral homes.


Sunday, March 23, 2014

March 26th Program Meeting - Carol Baird on "Postcard Collections and Genealogy"

WEDNESDAY, March 26th
 PROGRAM MEETING
from 12 noon to 2 p.m.
At Chula Vista Civic Center Library Auditorium (365 F Street)

Carol Baird: “Postcards Collections and Genealogy”


 Why study postcard collections for genealogical research? It is one of the most popular collecting hobbies since it started in the 1870s. Your ancestors may have sent postcards to their relatives showing their home, town, vacation, or passenger ship. In this talk, Carol will talk about the history of postcards, what you can learn from postcards, and how you can use postcards in your genealogical research.

 Carol Davidson Baird is the only child of German survivors of the Holocaust and has researched her family for 42 years. She is past president of San Diego JGS and North San Diego County Genealogical Society as well as past editor for both society newsletters and has served on the Board of Directors of NSDCGS since 1999. She is past co-editor of Stammbaum and wrote the IAJGS manual on how to start a JGS in your hometown. She writes for journals and newsletters and lectures on German Jewish and Holocaust genealogy throughout California. Carol's many travels to Europe with her family included visits to archives, town halls and concentration camps. Carol has an archive room in her home.

This meeting is open to all persons, and is free of charge to attend.  There will be a short society business meeting before the program speaker.  Snacks are provided by CVGS volunteers before and after the meeting. 

Monday, March 17, 2014

CVGS Newsletter for March 2014

The February 2014 issue of the Chula Vista Genealogical Society (CVGS) Newsletter was published last week.  You can read it online, in a PDF format - use the Newsletter link at www.CVGenealogy.org.


The Table of Contents lists:

page 1 - March 26th Program Meeting 
page 2 - President’s Message
page 2 - April 5th Workshop
page 3 - Spring Seminar News
page 4 - Scholarship Fund Basket 

page 5 - Research Group Review
page 6 - Next Computer Group Meeting
page 6 - April 23rd Genealogy Research Trip
page 6 - Hospitality Committee Needs You!
page 6 - Escondido Family History Fair Review

page 7 - February 26th Program Review
page 7 - Watch RootsTech Recorded Sessions
page 8 - Lemon Grove Research Group News
page 8 - More Research Tips for Beginning Genealogists
page 9 - CVGS Society Information 

page 9 - San Diego Genealogy Events 
page 10 - Genealogy Days in Chula Vista


Wednesday, March 5, 2014

CVGS Saturday Workshop on Saturday, 8 March is on Kentucky Research

The March Saturday Workshop is on 8 March at 12:30 p.m. at the Bonita-Sunnyside Library in Bonita, California (4375 Bonita Road, turn left at Billy Casper Way).  

Susi Pentico will lead a discussion about Kentucky Research.  Bring your Kentucky research problems and questions, and share what you know about researching in this state.


Monday, March 3, 2014

February Program Review - Ceasar Castro's "California in the Mexican-American War"

The 26 February program presentation for the Chula Vista Genealogical Society was "California and the Mexican War (1846-1850) from a Genealogical Point of View" by CVGS member Ceasar Castro.

Ceasar noted that historians want to highlight leaders and events, but genealogists want to find information about individuals - not only the leaders, but the soldiers and residents also.

In this talk, Ceasar provided a detailed history timeline of the events that led up to the Mexican-American War (1846-1848), not only in California but also in the United States and in Mexico.  

California was explored in the 16th century by Cortez, Cabrillo and others, but it wasn't until 1697 when Spain granted permission to the Jesuits to settle Baja California in Loreto, and built a series of missions.  Alta California was not settled until Jose de Galvez and Father Junipero Serra arrived in and built a mission in San Diego in 1769.  More missions and presidios were built up and down the coast until the 1820s, when Mexico declared independence from Spain.  The Spanish and Mexican governments conferred large land grants, called ranchos, on retired soldiers and their friends after independence. 

The first U.S. citizen to settle in California was Thomas Larkin in Monterey in 1832 as a consul.  Others followed in small groups, especially in northern California around the San Francisco Bay and along the California Trail through Sacramento and the Sierra Nevada.  

John Fremont was tasked by the U.S. government to come overland in June 1845 to survey western North America, and he arrived at Sutter's Fort in the Valley and in Monterey and met Larkin.  The U.S. Navy sailed along the coast and occasionally had conflicts in the ports.  The catalyst for the Mexican-American War was probably statehood granted Texas in 1845, and increasing conflicts with Mexico.  War was declared by Congress and President Polk in May 1846.  Orders were given to capture California and small battles occurred in Los Angeles, Monterey, Sonoma, Vallejo and other settlements between U.S. settlers, soldiers and sailors and the Mexican soldiers and settlers.  

U.S. soldiers under General Stephen Kearny, the 500-strong Mormon Battalion, and a group of New York Volunteers, headed to California overland and by ship around the Horn.  Sonoma, Monterey and Yerba Buena (San Francisco) were captured by U.S. forces already in California, and Los Angeles was contested for months.  The Bear Flag Republic was declared in Sonoma in June 1846.  Los Angeles was recaptured by the Mexicans and Californios in September 1846. 

Kearny's troops arrived in early December 1846 in eastern San Diego county, and found the Mexican and Californio defenders who had been alerted by residents on a nearby rancho.  The Battle of San Pasqual ensued and Ceasar described it in significant detail.  Both sides eventually claimed victory, but the U.S. side had more casualties.  

Throughout the discussion, Ceasar presented lists of the known U.S. participants in the different movements and skirmishes.  His handout provided a bibliography of historical books that discussed the military, political and social history of California in the 1840s.

Ceasar will finish the history and have more information about California as it approached statehood in 1850 in a subsequent presentation in September.


Saturday, March 1, 2014

Genealogy Days in Chula Vista - March 2014

The Chula Vista Genealogical Society events for March 2014 include:

**  Saturday, 8 March, 12 noon to 3 p.m., Bonita-Sunnyside Library (4375 Bonita Road) -- Saturday Workshop:  Susi Pentico will lead a discussion on "Kentucky Research."

** Wednesday 12 March, 12 noon to 2 p.m., Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library (365 F Street) -- CVGS Research Group WILL NOT MEET this month due to library closure during the week of March 10 to 16.

** Wednesday, 19 March, 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library (365 F Street) -- CVGS Computer Group meets in the Library Computer Lab, led by Gary Brock and Shirley Becker. Bring your laptops to sharpen your computer skills and investigate online genealogy resources.

** Wednesday, 26 March, 12 noon to 2 p.m., Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library (365 F Street) -- CVGS Program Meeting in the Auditorium.  Carol Baird will present "Postcards for Genealogy"  Refreshments before and after the meeting.

**  Wednesdays, 5, 19 and 26 March, 10 a.m. to 12 noon, Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library (365 F Street)-- Research Assistance in the Family Research area.  John Finch will help you with your research problems.  Bring your laptop if you want to do online research.

The Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library is located at 365 "F" Street in Chula Vista - between Third Avenue and Fourth Avenue, midway between I-5 and I-805 (take the "E" Street exit from the freeways).

The Bonita-Sunnyside (County) Library is located at 4375 Bonita Road in Bonita - turn north on Billy Casper Way, just west of the Otay Lakes Road intersection with Bonita Road, on the north side of Bonita Road.

We welcome guests and visitors to our CVGS programs and events - if you are in the greater San Diego area and want to attend our events - please come and introduce yourselves.  All CVGS events are FREE to attend, except for some seminars and picnics.


Saturday, February 22, 2014

CVGS Program Meeting - 26 February 2014 Features Ceasar Castro

 WEDNESDAY, February 26th
 PROGRAM MEETING
from 12 noon to 2 p.m.
At Chula Vista Civic Center Library Auditorium (365 F Street)

Ceasar Castro: “California and the Mexican-American War 
From a Genealogical Point of View”

 Ceasar Castro is a local boy. He graduated from Hilltop High School and San Diego State with a degree in Electrical Engineering.  He worked at the Navy R&D Laboratory on Point Loma for 36 years before retiring. 


 Ceasar started working on his genealogy in 2008 when his sister, who had started earlier, asked him for help. However, slowly he took over the research. He joined the San Diego Genealogy Society and the Chula Vista Genealogy Society to learn more about genealogy. All of his ancestors come from Baja California. In researching his Castro ancestors, he discovered that two of his great-grandaunts married Irishmen in Baja. This puzzled him - how did the Irishmen end up in Baja around 1850? This started him delving into the history of Baja and resulted in his research on the Mexican-American War.

 When historians write about history, they are interested in who made decisions and the result of those decisions. If an army is involved, they may give the names of some of the officers but not of the common soldiers. They usually only give the number of soldiers. But we are genealogist; we seek the names of all the soldiers. That is because we are usually looking for a particular person(s). This presentation on the Mexican-American War is from that perspective; what were the names of all the people involved in the Mexican-American War in California.

This meeting is open to all persons, and is free of charge to attend.  There will be a short society business meeting before the program speaker.  Snacks are provided by CVGS volunteers before and after the meeting.

Sunday, February 16, 2014

CVGS Research Group Review - February 2014

The February meeting of the Chula Vista Genealogical Society (CVGS) Research Group on 12 February was a lively affair with 22 in attendance, including two new members.

After introductions, there were announcements about the Escondido Family History Fair on 1 March 2014 - it's free but you need to register - and the CVGS Spring Seminar on 29 March 2014 with Jean Wilcox Hibben as the featured speaker.

In the first hour, Randy highlighted his experiences at RootsTech 2014, noting that the syllabus is still online for download at https://rootstech.org/about/syllabus-materials/ and there are 17 online videos from the keynotes and selected classes at https://rootstech.org/about/videos/.

He attempted to show Judy Russell's keynote talk in the meeting, but the video was stalled by the relatively poor cell reception in the conference room.  Instead, Randy showed his Flipboard magazine for "Randy at RootsTech 2014" at https://flipboard.com/section/randy-at-rootstech-2014-bFpVfG.

In the second hour, several attendees shared their recent experiences and research questions:

*  Gary found several photos from his mother's estate that did not have persons identified on them, so he is trying to match faces from those photos to photos that do have names on them.  For one photo, he put other photos of who he thought might be the same person on the same sheet of paper; the group thought that they were not the same person.  For a second photo, he had five other photos of the known person, and the group thought they were the same person.  The group noted that there are several websites that do face matching from photographs.

*  Helen had a photo in her collection and didn't know who it was.  She was checking Ancestry Member Trees for her 3rd great-grandfather, John Henry Winkle, and saw the same photo attached to another person's tree with the name.

*  Felicia has a family story that her ancestor, Mary Gillham who married a Campbell, had been kidnapped by the Kickapoo tribe in the early 1800s, was found and ransomed in Illinois, and an Act of Congress granted land to her in 1815.  She wondered if there are any records for the land grant.  The group said that Acts of Congress should be available to review and to check the Library of Congress and the National Archives.  Land may have been granted through the Bureau of Land Management - check the http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/ website.

*  Gerry's mother had German ancestry, and she wondered how to find more information about it. The group recommended finding as many records as possible (marriage, death, immigration, naturalization, obituary, cemetery, childrens births, etc.) that might identify where she was born and her parents, or siblings, names; then search for records for the parents and siblings also.  Then check with the San Diego Genealogical Society German interest group, the San Diego FamilySearch Library in Mission Valley, and the www.GermanRoots.com website for research helps.  Her mother's grandfather's name was Christian Floel, and we found that he had a Civil War Pension File that could be ordered from the National Archives for a fee.

The next meeting of the CVGS Research Group will be on 12 March 2014 at 12 noon in the Conference Room at the Chula Vista Civic Center Library (365 F Street).



Wednesday, February 12, 2014

CVGS Newsletter for February 2014

The February 2014 issue of the Chula Vista Genealogical Society (CVGS) Newsletter was published last week.  You can read it online, in a PDF format - use the Newsletter link at www.CVGenealogy.org.



The Table of Contents lists:

page 1 - February 26th Program Meeting 
page 2 - President’s Message
page 3 - Spring Seminar News
page 4 - Scholarship Fund Basket 
page 5 - Research Group Review

page 6 - March 8th Workshop
page 6 - Next Computer Group Meeting
page 6 - Genealogy Field Trip Review
page 6 - Escondido Family History Fair
page 7 - January 29th Program Review

page 7 - Watch RootsTech Recorded Sessions
page 8 - Lemon Grove Research Group News
page 8 - February 1st Saturday Workshop Review
page 8 - More Research Tips for Beginning Genealogists
page 9 - CVGS Society Information 

page 9 - San Diego Genealogy Events 
page 10 - Genealogy Days in Chula Vista


Friday, February 7, 2014

FREE Escondido Family History Fair is Saturday, 1 March 2014

The FREE Escondido (CA) Family History Fair "Life in the Past Lane"  will be on Saturday, 1 March 2014, from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m, at the Escondido Family Discovery Center at 2255 Felicita Road in Escondido (760-745-1662).  

The Escondido FHFair website is at http://www.escondidofhc.com/family-history-fair/.


At the top of the page are links for the Fair Information, Workshops OfferedPresenter Biographies, Fair Registration, and Order Lunch (which costs $9.75 and benefits the Boy Scouts).

There are five presenter session times, and a total of 43 classes, with 12 speakers, including Dan Poffenberger, Jean Wilcox Hibben, Debby Horton, Michaele Burris, Ann Montgomery, Tom Underhill, Del Ritchhart, Joel Weintraub, Cassandra Helzer, Ed Ries, Alice Volkert, and Butch Hibben.

Attendees must register to attend, and early registrants will receive a free Wall Fan Chart (if they have added their family to the FamilySearch Family Tree or upload a GEDCOM file after registering).  The chart looks like this:


This is an excellent opportunity to obtain genealogy education for little or no cost from well-known presenters.  I encourage local San Diego society members to sign up at attend.