Friday, October 31, 2014

October Program Review - Annette Hubbell's "Witness to Gettysburg"

Annette Hubbell, in a mid-1800s period costume, wowed the 45 CVGS attendees in the 29 October program with her spellbinding enactment of "Witness to Gettysburg."  In two sessions, she brought Miss Hattie Elizabeth Turner to life as she relives the Battle of Gettysburg and a small town’s courageous efforts to care for 30,000 Union and Confederate casualties suddenly left in its aftermath, weaving into it stories of historic characters. 

She states "I remember everything as though it was yesterday" as she described the times before and during the early years of the Civil War.  Her husband was a Captain in the Pennsylvania 90th regiment of the Union Army, and she and two other women followed the regiment to help, sew, and pray for their men, who ended up in Gettysburg in June 1963.  On June 29th, Gettysburg was a lovely green town with rolling hills and orchards, with 90,000 Union soldiers and 70,000 Confederate soldiers lined up preparing for the fight.  The battle erupted, it's noisy, hot, bloody, and fearful for Hattie and others caught up in it.  She said "We are strong women, but no one is prepared for this."  Then she's notified that her husband is one of the dead.

By 4 July, the battle is over, and there were 8,000 wounded left on the battlefield.  There were 23,000 Union dead, and 28,000 Confederate dead, plus 5,000 dead horses, fouling the streams.  The stench of rotting corpses was pervasive.  What would the people of Gettysburg do?  They burned the horses, buried the dead where they lay, and set up temporary field hospitals in houses and barns within a 30 mile radius.  Those wounded soldiers that could walk went to the train station to recuperate at home.  Those with a hope for survival were treated, operated on, bandaged, and hoped to recover.  Those with no hope of survival were comforted until they died.  

By 22 July, there were 500 tents on 80 acres, and each person like Hattie had 50 to 80 persons to care for.  There were only 3,000 patients by 2 August, and only 100 by early November.  President Lincoln came to Gettysburg on 16 November, and Hattie was there.  She went home on the train, but was not the same person who came to Gettysburg.

After a break, Annette returned for her second presentation in dark clothing.  Set some years later, she noted that the Civil War tore the fabric of social and political America.  The people of Gettysburg did what they had to do and did it well.  Hattie described the 7 layers of dress that she wore, noted that the shackles of traditional activity for women had been reduced, and that, because of the work of women after the battle in Gettysburg, nurses were able to serve in the military after the war.  She discussed the mourning and burial traditions prevalent at the time - boiling and dyeing clothes black, wearing a black cockade, etc.  She told several stories of Gettysburg residents who helped the soldiers, and read several letters from soldiers about their experience.  

Hattie's final words were "We who survived are haunted by what we saw."  What a powerful story!

For more information about Annette and her program, visit www.annettehubbell.com.

After the program, Annette answered numerous questions about Miss Hattie, the Civil War, and Annette's journey in presenting this one-woman dramatic presentation.


Thursday, October 30, 2014

Saturday Workshop on Maryland genealogy on 1 November 2014

The November Saturday Workshop for the Chula Vista Genealogical Society (CVGS) is Saturday, 1 November 2014 at the Bonita-Sunnyside Library (4375 Bonita Road) from 12 noon to 3 p.m.

\Susi Pentico will lead a discussion of Maryland Genealogy resources.  


Saturday, October 25, 2014

CVGS Program Meeting on 29 October - "Witness to Gettysburg"

 WEDNESDAY, October 29th PROGRAM MEETING
from 12 noon to 2 p.m.

At Bonita-Sunnyside Library Community Room (4375 Bonita Road)

Annette  Hubbell – “Witness to Gettysburg”

     The pursuit of family history includes the desire to carve out a place for one's family in the larger historical picture, a sense of responsibility to preserve the past for future generations, and a sense of self-satisfaction in accurate storytelling. 

     It is that last point, storytelling, which brings Miss Hattie to our October meeting. Behind the discovery of dates and family lineage are the stories of family. Miss Hattie Elizabeth Turner was a witness to the Battle of Gettysburg. Inspired by the diary of Hattie Elizabeth Unangst, Miss Hubbell spent nearly two years researching and writing this performance after spending time in Gettysburg in 2007. Miss Hubbell also draws upon the words and experiences from other witnesses to the war’s fearful struggle, weaving a compelling story of American grit and determination that cannot help but leave one with a renewed appreciation for the sacrifice our forefathers made to preserve the ideals of this Country. The women, the soldiers, the boys who found themselves in uniforms, and how the sheer number of the war’s dead forever changed our burial customs and traditions is told.




     Writer and actress Annette Hubbell takes us back to Gettysburg and its frightful aftermath. Thousands of soldiers converged, fought, and just as suddenly left, leaving 30,000 casualties. Just what does a town of 2,400 do when suddenly faced with this calamity? “Witness to Gettysburg” opens on the eve of the battle and ends with President Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. “I love to tell her story,” Annette says. “It is one of courage and conviction and character.”

     Annette reinvented herself, acting and writing after retiring as General Manager from a San Diego North County water district. Currently she is performing in Witness to Gettysburg (over 120 performances) and as Eleanor Roosevelt in Tea with Mrs. Roosevelt. Witness to Gettysburg is also available on DVD. Adapted from the stage play, the film adds music and original photographs to this dramatic story.  The DVD will be available at the meeting for a special performance price of $10.00.


Saturday, October 18, 2014

Research Trip to San Diego Central Library on Wednesday, 22 October

    John Finch will lead a Research Trip to the San Diego Central Library (330 Park Blvd., San Diego) on Wednesday, 22 October.  As, we have done before, we will meet at the Chula Vista parking structure off F St. and car pool, leaving at about 11:30 am. The library opens at 12 noon.  Return time will be about 3 p.m.   Instead of using the trolley for this trip, John thought it might be helpful if everyone learned how to access that $3.00 a day parking in the Padres tailgating parking lot.  Please contact John at jan27@cox.net to save your seat in the car pool.  

     Unfortunately, the SDGS docents will not be available, but the library staff will help patrons with questions and problems.  There are a number of computers to use with several commercial genelaogy databases for those who want to do online research.  

Not all of the books that were in the SDGS Library have been catalogued at the Central Library.  Check the SDGS Research Catalog web page (http://casdgs.org/libraryRecords.php) before you go and ask to have the items of interest pulled for you by library staff when you are at the library. 

Monday, October 13, 2014

CVGS Computer Group Meeting - 15 October 2014

The October Computer Group Meeting for the Chula Vista Genealogical Society (CVGS) is on Wednesday, 15 October 2014 at the Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library (365 F Street) in the Computer Lab.

Since Shirley iso ut of town, Gary will be the leader for this meeting.

Friday, October 10, 2014

Research Group Review - 8 October 2014

The October 8th meeting of the Chula Vista Genealogical Society (CVGS) Research Group had 14 attendees.

In the first hour, Randy reviewed the upcoming CVGS events, and then reviewed how to obtain a Social Security Application.  He showed some of the photographs of CVGS member dorothy on her trip to Denmark from Facebook.  Lastly, he described the new website, www.FamilyTreeNow.com, which has U.S. census and vital records, including a People Finder database that looks free and useful.

In the second hour, the research challenges, questions and successes were shared by the attendees, including:

1)  Kathleen had several questions, including how to obtain a Marriage  record and a Divorce decree in Oregon.  The group suggested searching online databases on Ancestry and FamilySearch, for the marriage record, and checking Oregon county court records for information about divorce record access.

She also asked how she can find more information about her great-grandmother, born in 1817 and died in 1908 in Oregon.  A search on Ancestry.com revealed a Find A Grave entry that helped, but few census records, perhaps due to the variable spelling of the surname.  

2)  Arlene noted that a gravestone for Joseph Hartman (1753-1831) has several generations on the stone (found on Find A Grave), but it's not her Joseph Hartman.  Too bad!

3) Linda met with Ceasar at San Diego Central Library to work on Mexico records for some of her ancestors.

4)   Jane's friend insisted that she open the box in her craft room.  When she did, she found family pictures, her father's report card with her grandfather's signature.

5)  Kathleen found a photograph of her grandmother in another person's Ancestry Member Tree.

6)  Sylvia was told that her Hoover ancestor was a Rough Rider with Theodore Roosevelt in the Spanish-American War.  A check on Wikipedia and other sites did not list the name.

7)  Diane noted that, based on the Anderson Cooper episode on Finding Your Roots, that you never know what you're going to find, and that you should contact relatives to see what they know.

8)  Gary laid out several pictures from his step-father to determine if they were the same person, and some had writing on the back with identifications.  He found some matches.

9)  Virginia's neighbor's daughter wanted to tear up a family photograph because the picture showed an ancestor in a Nazi Youth uniform.

10)  Susi noted that a change to the number of AncestryDNA matches is coming soon.

The next CVGS Research Group meeting will be Wednesday, 12 November at the Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library in the Conference Room.

Thursday, October 9, 2014

October 2014 Issue of CVGS Newsletter is Available

The October 2014 issue of the Chula Vista Genealogical Society (CVGS) Newsletter was published this week.  You can read it online, in a PDF format - use the Newsletter link at www.CVGenealogy.org.


The Table of Contents lists:

page 1 -- October 29th Program Meeting 
page 2 -- President’s Message 
page 2 -- Nametags

page 2 --  Membership Dues for 2014page 3 -- 2014 Season of Finding Your Roots Coming
page 3 -  Obtaining a Social Security Application

page 4 -- Lemon Grove Research Group News
page 4 -- Computer Group Review 
page 4 -- Research Trip to San Diego Central Library

page 4 -- Barbara Zaragoza Book Signing   on 10/18
page 5 -- October 4th Workshop Highlights

page 6 -- Research Group Review
page 7 -- September 24th Program Review
page 7 -- RootsTech and FGS 2015 Registrations

page 8 -- Preserving My Family History for Posteritypage 9 -- CVGS Society Information 

page 9 -- San Diego Genealogy Events 
page 10 -- Genealogy Days in Chula Vista

Monday, October 6, 2014

October 4th Saturday Workshop Review (by Susi Pentico)

     The “Engaging Your Family in Your Family History” workshop at Bonita-Sunnyside Library had 20 attendees, including 4 visitors.  

     We were happy for those who came and shared and shared and cared.  We all went home happy and tired but felt that the attendees were really getting what we were attempting to share with them.  Research is always easier when you can share and cross-check and discuss the potentials of information. It can be regionally, locally or distantly - it makes a difference to share.

     Much credit goes to the Chart Chick, Janet Hovorka of Family ChartMasters, for her ideas and thoughts and the charts she provided.  

     The first session (of five) was “Create a Keepsake” led by Susi Pentico.  A society tablecloth was signed by the attendees. If you signed it, just think - your name is going to kick around for quite some time. A suggestion was for small families to use a pillow for the signatures.  Wedding gifts, family reunions, baby shower gifts, birthday party gifts could use the same theme idea. 

     The second session was “Storytelling.”  Each attendee told a family story about their own life or that of an ancestor. As one person said, “if we did this question every four years, the stories would change.”  It would almost be like a running diary of their growing up and living life from a small child to an adult.  

     After lunch, the third session, “Design a Family Crest,” was led by Karen Yarger.  She talked about heraldry, and then demonstrated how to inspire family members to make a family crest, based on their interests and creativity.

     In the fourth session, Karen demonstrated “Pictures With Captions.”  Everyone had great fun adding funny captions to sample family photographs using “speech bubbles” and “thought balloons.”

     The fifth and last session was “Family Genealogy Charts,” led by Susi.  The handout packet contained five helpful genealogy charts – a pedigree chart, a family group sheet, a census chart, a research log, and a record type list.  In addition a large multi-generational family tree chart, provided by Janet Hovorka, was given to each attendee.  

     I am hoping the 20 attendees will share in January how these ideas helped to get the family to think a little more about family history and how we lived in the past. Even if the past was only 20 years ago, it makes a difference. 

Friday, October 3, 2014

CVGS October 4th Workshop: "Engaging Your Family in Your Family History"

 FREE October 4th  Workshop

“Engaging Your Family in Your Family’s History”

10 a.m. to 4 p.m, in the Community Room
at the Bonita-Sunnyside Library, 4375 Bonita Road

 Genealogy can be a solitary hobby. How often have you tried to interest your family in their family history and your genealogy research? If you’ve been greeted by “ho hums” and “I don’t have time,” we have the perfect workshop for you. The CVGS Seminar Committee has planned a day of ideas and projects to spark that interest in your family, with special focus on getting the kids ‘hooked.’

 The first of five sessions, “Create a Keepsake” will show you how to have your family help create an heirloom that’s fun and practical. You will laugh when you see what it is.

 The second session is titled “Storytelling.” Bring a short episode to share with the group - just a minute or two. It can be funny or dramatic, from your life or a distant relative’s. You’ll learn how the sharing of stories around the dinner table will get your family to open up. And how the children love to hear of their parents’ misadventures! Family history can be fun!

Bring a sack lunch, and we’ll eat picnic-style on the patio (weather permitting). Coffee, tea and water will be provided.

 After lunch you can try your hand at an artistic project in “Design a Family Crest.” We will offer a brief overview of heraldry and show how you can get your family to design their own coat of arms. If your ancestors had a family crest, please bring it; perhaps you will learn something about its symbolism. And, here’s more fun for the kids – you’ll get some good tips on getting them to design their own personal coat of arms. What little boy wouldn’t want a crest with a T-Rex on it?

 The fourth session, “Pictures with Captions,” will show how old family photos can provide a fun family activity. Bring copies of old photos (the ones from the 1950’s can be a hoot!). We will show you how comic-style ‘speech bubbles’ will get the family giggling and trying to top each other with funny captions.

 We will cover “Family Genealogy Charts” in the final hour. You will receive a packet of useful charts with instructions on how to use them. If you’re a genealogy beginner, bring information on your parents and grandparents and our member experts will assist you. For the more advanced, we will offer useful information; and everyone will take home a large family tree chart to impress your family.

We will provide materials. This will be a great interactive event, so don’t forget to bring a short family story, copies of old photos, a sack lunch, a family coat of arms if you have one, and information to fill out a family tree.

 All this, and a great Door Prize, too, supplied by Janet Hovorka (the “Chart Chick” and owner of www.FamilyChartMasters.com), who is providing the large family tree charts! And it's FREE!!

 This is a FREE workshop for all persons to attend, intended to help beginners and seasoned 
researchers engage with their family members in learning about their family history.

 For more information, contact Susi Pentico at susicp@cox.net or (619) 623-5250. Thank you to Karen Yarger for writing this article! 

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Genealogy Days in Chula Vista - October 2014

The Chula Vista Genealogical Society events for October 2014 include:

**  Saturday, 4 October, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Bonita-Sunnyside Library (4375 Bonita Road) -- Saturday Workshop:  Susi Pentico will lead a workshop on "Engaging Your Family in Family History."  
 Bring a bag lunch.

** Wednesday, 8 October, 12 noon to 2 p.m., Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library (365 F Street) -- CVGS Research Group meets in the Library Conference Room, led by Randy Seaver.  We will review the latest genealogy news, share success stories and information, and discuss members research problems, and potential solutions, based on the collective knowledge and wisdom of the group.  

** Wednesday, 15 October, 12 noon to 1:30 p.m., Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library (365 F Street) -- CVGS Computer Group meets in the Library Computer Lab, led by Shirley Becker. Bring your laptops to sharpen your computer skills and investigate online genealogy resources.

** Wednesday, 22 October, 10 a.m.  to 2 p.m., San Diego Central Library  -- CVGS Field Trip.  Contact John Finch to sign up for car pool.

** Wednesday, 22 October, 12 noon  to 2 p.m., Bonita-Sunnyside Library (4375 Bonita Road) -- CVGS Program Meeting meets in the Community Room.  The speaker will be Annette Hubbell on "Witness to Gettysburg." Refreshments before and after the meeting.

**  Saturday, 1 November, 12 noon to 3 p.m., Bonita-Sunnyside Library (4375 Bonita Road) -- 
CVGS Workshop.  Susi Pentico will moderate a discussion on "Maryland Research." 

**  Wednesdays, 1, 8, 15, and 29 October, 10 a.m. to 12 noon, Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library (365 F Street) --Research Assistance in the Family Research area.  John Finch will help you with your research problems.  Bring your laptop if you want to do online research.

The Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library is located at 365 "F" Street in Chula Vista - between Third Avenue and Fourth Avenue, midway between I-5 and I-805 (take the "E" Street exit from the freeways).

The Bonita-Sunnyside (County) Library is located at 4375 Bonita Road in Bonita - turn north on Billy Casper Way, just west of the Otay Lakes Road intersection with Bonita Road, on the north side of Bonita Road.

We welcome guests and visitors to our CVGS programs and events - if you are in the greater San Diego area and want to attend our events - please come and introduce yourselves.  All CVGS events are FREE to attend, except for some seminars and picnics.

Sunday, September 28, 2014

September Program Review - Ceasar Castro on Mexican-American War - Part 2

Part 2 of Ceasar Castro's presentation on "California and the Mexican-American War From a Genealogical Point of View" was attended by 30 CVGS members and guests on Wednesday, 24 September at the Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library.

Ceasar noted that historians want to highlight leaders and events, but genealogists want to find information about individuals - not only the leaders, but the soldiers and residents also.

In this talk, Ceasar provided a detailed history timeline of the events that 
covered the second capture of Alta California in late 1846, the battles in Baja California, and the end of the war in California in mid-1848.


In San Diego County, Colonel Stephen Kearny and his dragoons fought the Californios at the Battle of San Pasqual in December 1846, arrived in San Diego, and soon went to Los Angeles.  In the meantime, Major John Fremont moved south from Monterey to meet Kearny in Los Angeles.  Commodore Robert Stockton also moved from San Diego to Los Angeles to quell the Californios.  The last battle for Alta California was in early California, and the Treaty of Cahuenga was signed with the Californios on 13 January 1847.  

 Kearny claimed command of California at the end of hostilities, and had a rivalry with Stockton.  Fremont was named Governor of California, but was succeeded by Kearny as Governor in Monterey on 1 March 1847.  

In the mean time, other military units arrived overland and by sea to help in California, and were soon directed to the southern tip of Baja California, traveling by sea.  There were battles at San Jose del Cabo, La Paz and Mulege, with the Americans eventually subduing the Mexicans.  The Battle of Todos Santos ended the fighting on 30 March 1847.  

The fighting in Mexico ended in early 1848, and the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo was signed in Queretaro on 2 April 1848.  The treaty made Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California part of the United States, and Mexico received $15 million.  Mexican residents of the captured territories were free to remain or go to Mexico, their property rights and land grants were respected.  Some Baja California residents were granted transportation to Monterey and to make property claims in late 1848.

During this presentation, Ceasar highlighted the names of many of the members of the American forces who served in the different military units, and the Californios who fought with them.

Ceasart's handout was a general description of his two presentations, with a bibliography of published books and local places of historical interest.


Wednesday, September 24, 2014

New Books in the CVGS Collection

The Chula Vista Genealogical Society has over 1,800 titles in the book and periodical collection at the Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library at 365 F Street in Chula Vista, California.

 Thanks to the generosity of some of our members, and thanks to the Friends of the Library for looking out for us as genealogy books are donated to them, and thanks to our own Society for purchasing books in order to continually improve our collection, we have added several new books to our shelves. In case you are interested, you might want to take a look:

359.7097 MCH San Diego & Honolulu: A PhotoJournal through a Sailor's Eye, 1920-1943, by 
Petei McHenry

929.1072 KEN Genealogical Records in Texas, by Imogene Kinard Kennedy & J. Leon Kennedy

929.1072 KRU A Guide to Chicago & Midwestern Polish-American Genealogy by Jason Kruski

929.1072 PET Raking the Ashes: Genealogical Strategies for Pre-1906 San Francisco Research,
by Nancy S. Peterson

929.3 DOB The French in the Americas, 1620-1820 by David Dobson

929.373 ARO Wanted: US Criminal Records, by Ron Arons

976.4004 ZES The Captured: A True Story of Abduction by Indians on the Texas Frontier, by 
Scott Zesch

978.1 RIL Pioneers of the Bluestem Prairie, compiled by Riley County Genealogical Society

979.478 CHU Chula Vista-The Early Years, Vol. 1, compiled by the Chula Vista Historical 
Society

Sunday, September 21, 2014

9/24 Program is Ceasar Castro on Mexican-American War - Part 2

WEDNESDAY, September 24 th PROGRAM MEETING
from 12 noon to 2 p.m.
At Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library Auditorium

Ceasar Castro – “California and the Mexican-American War
from a Genealogical Point of View– Part 2”

Ceasar Castro is a local boy. He graduated from Hilltop High School and San Diego State with a degree in Electrical Engineering.  He worked at the Navy R&D Laboratory on Point Loma for 36 years before retiring.



Ceasar started working on his genealogy in 2008 when his sister, who had started earlier, asked him for help. However, slowly he took over the research. He joined the San Diego Genealogy Society and the Chula Vista Genealogy Society to learn more about genealogy. All of his ancestors come from Baja California. In researching his Castro ancestors, he discovered that two of his great-grandaunts married Irishmen in Baja. This puzzled him - how did the Irishmen end up in Baja around 1850? This started him delving into the history of Baja and resulted in his research on the Mexican-American War.

When historians write about history, they are interested in who made decisions and the result of those decisions. If an army is involved, they may give the names of some of the officers but not of the common soldiers. They usually only give the number of soldiers. But we are  genealogists; we seek the names of all the soldiers. That is because we are usually looking for a particular person(s). This presentation on the Mexican-American War is from that perspective; what were the names of all the people involved in the Mexican-American War in California.

This presentation is a continuation from the February 2014 presentation.


Saturday, September 13, 2014

CVGS Research Group Review - September 10th

The September 10th meeting of the Chula Vista Genealogical Society (CVGS) Research Group had 21 attendees.

In the first hour, Randy reviewed upcoming CVGS meetings, the SDGS seminar on 27 September, and noted that the FamilySearch Obituary Collection now includes GenealogyBank obituaries.

He described helping CVGS member Dorothy, who is going to Demanrk in late September, with her Danish genealogy research.  After writing a post on his blog, there were several helpful comments from readers and Facebook members, including offers for help from researchers in Denmark.  The blog post provided a list of websites to check for Denmark resources.

In the second hour, the research challenges, questions and successes were highlighted by some of the attendees, including:

*  Jean asked for help finding probate records of Nehemiah Tompkins, who died in Ontario County, N.Y. in 1836.  Randy showed to find this record in the New York Probate Records collection on FamilySearch, but there was no entry for him in the Probate record index.

*  Sally wanted help finding information for the ancestors of her husband's second great-grandfather, Julius Schaefer (1866-1968).  She had a 1966 Wichita, Kansas newspaper article celebrating his 100th birthday.  The article said his birthplace was Schramberg in West Germany.  The group suggested finding all possible records in the United States that might name his parents, such as a death certificate, the Social Security Application, a passenger list, and a naturalization record.  Then look for church records in Germany on FHL microfilms.

*  Diane found a family coat of arms and wondered what the difference was between a crest and a coat-of-arms.  Karen explained that the crest was part of the coat-of-arms.  A Wikipedia article was found to explain it.

*  Helen is still researching her Burleson family in Arkansas.  She found land records in Clark County, Arkansas in 1858.  A recently found correspondent has more records to share with Helen.

*  Sylvia's great-grandfather immigrated in 1857, resided in Fargo, N.D., and then moved to Tulare, Calif.  She found a naturalization record in Tulare, but it was not the declaration of intent.  She asked if there might be more records.  The group suggested checking the National Archives branch near Fargo to determine if one is available.

*  Ana asked if FamilySearch has removed record images from some of their collections.  The group noted that every collection has contractual obligations, and some contracts expire.  The removed images might be available on microfilm at the FamilySearch Library.

*  John was contacted by a lady in Spokane who had been adopted.  Due to a change in records access law for adoptees, she found out her birth mother's name, and found it in John's Ancestry Member Tree.  After she contacted him through Ancestry, John's response to her was "I'm her brother, and I've been waiting for your call for a long time."  John's family knew about the baby that his sister had as a teenager.  He has shared more family information and is looking forward to meeting his niece sometime soon.

The next Research Group meeting will be on Wednesday, 8 October at 12 noon in the Conference Room at the Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library.






Thursday, September 11, 2014

September 2014 Issue of the CVGS Newsletter is Available

The September 2014 issue of the Chula Vista Genealogical Society (CVGS) Newsletter was published this week.  You can read it online, in a PDF format - use the Newsletter link at www.CVGenealogy.org.



The Table of Contents lists:

page 1 -- September 24th Program Meeting 
page 2 -- President’s Message 
page 2 -- Nametags
page 3 -- 2014 Season of Finding Your Roots Coming
page 3 -  Ancestry.com Mobile App New Features

page 4 -- Lemon Grove Research Group News
page 4 -- Computer Group Review 
page 4 -- San Diego OASIS Classes
page 5 -- FREE October 4th Workshop
page 6 -- Research Group Review


page 7 -- August 27th Program Review

page 7 -- RootsTech and FGS 2015 Registrationspage 8 -- New Books in CVGS Collection
page 8 -- SDGS 9/27 Seminarpage 9 -- CVGS Society Information 

page 9 -- San Diego Genealogy Events 
page 10 -- Genealogy Days in Chula Vista



Wednesday, September 3, 2014

September 6th Workshop at Bonita-Sunnyside Library - "Basic Genealogical Research Information"

The September 6th CVGS Workshop will be from 12 noon to 3 p.m. in the Community Room at the Bonita-Sunnyside Library (4375 Bonita Road).

Susi Pentico will lead this workshop of "Basic Genealogical Research Information."

This workshop is intended for beginning genealogists who want to understand the basics of genealogical research.  The topics covered will include:

*  A 5-generation pedigree chart
*  A Family Group Sheet
*  A Census record form
*  A Research log
*  A Research checklist

The forms will be provided to the attendees.


Monday, September 1, 2014

Genealogy Days in Chula Vista - September 2014

The Chula Vista Genealogical Society events for September 2014 include:

**  Saturday, 6 September, 12 noon to 3 p.m., Bonita-Sunnyside Library (4375 Bonita Road) -- Saturday Workshop:  Susi Pentico will lead a workshop on "Basic Genealogical Research Information."


** Wednesday, 10 September, 12 noon to 2 p.m., Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library (365 F Street) -- CVGS Research Group meets in the Library Conference Room, led by Randy Seaver.  We will review the latest genealogy news, share success stories and information, and discuss members research problems, and potential solutions, based on the collective knowledge and wisdom of the group.  

** Wednesday, 17 September, 12 noon to 1:30 p.m., Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library (365 F Street) -- CVGS Computer Group meets in the Library Computer Lab, led by Shirley Becker. Bring your laptops to sharpen your computer skills and investigate online genealogy resources.

** Wednesday, 24 September, 12 noon to 2 p.m., Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library (365 F Street) -- CVGS Program Meeting meets in the Auditorium.  The speaker will be Ceasar Castro on "California and the Mexican-American War, Part 2." Refreshments before and after the meeting.

**  Saturday, 4 October, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Bonita-Sunnyside Library (4375 Bonita Road) -- 
CVGS Workshop on "Engaging Your Family in Family History."  Bring a bag lunch.

**  Wednesdays, 3, 10, 17 and 24 September, 10 a.m. to 12 noon, Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library (365 F Street) --Research Assistance in the Family Research area.  John Finch will help you with your research problems.  Bring your laptop if you want to do online research.

The Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library is located at 365 "F" Street in Chula Vista - between Third Avenue and Fourth Avenue, midway between I-5 and I-805 (take the "E" Street exit from the freeways).

The Bonita-Sunnyside (County) Library is located at 4375 Bonita Road in Bonita - turn north on Billy Casper Way, just west of the Otay Lakes Road intersection with Bonita Road, on the north side of Bonita Road.

We welcome guests and visitors to our CVGS programs and events - if you are in the greater San Diego area and want to attend our events - please come and introduce yourselves.  All CVGS events are FREE to attend, except for some seminars and picnics.

Friday, August 29, 2014

August Program Review - Hall Horrocks on "British Parish Registers and Census Records"

The August 27th program for the Chula Vista Genealogical Society (CVGS)  featured Hal Horrocks speaking on "British Parish Registers and Census Records."  There were 35 persons in attendance.

Hal provided a list of important dates for British genealogical research, ranging from 1215 (the "Calling of the Banns" for marriage) to 1853 (the Cemetery Act).  The most important dates were 1538 when Parish Registers began, 1643 to 1660 when the British civil War caused disruption in registers, 1812 for better regulation of parish registers, 1754 when Lord Hardwick's Marriage Act enforced banns and licences, and 1837 when Civil Registration was started.

A "Parish Register" is a book kept by a parish church that recorded details of Baptisms, Marriages and Burials.  The originals are usually kept in vaults in a county office or at the British National Archives, may be microfilmed (the Family History Library has many of them), or online in the International Genealogical Index (on FamilySearch) or in a county Online Parish Clerk (OPC) website.

The baptism records usually record the baptism date, the name of the child, the parents' names, the father's occupation, and the family's abode.  The marriage record usually provides the marriage date, name of both parties,their condition (e.g., bachelor, spinster, widow), the type of marriage (banns or licence), sometimes their parents names, and their abode.  The burial records provide the burial date, the person's name, their age, and where the person lived when they died.

The British Census was taken every 10 years since 1801 (except for 1941), but census records with every name in a household started in 1841.  The last census presently available is the 1911 census.  All of the 1841 to 1911 census records are available in searchable databases with linked images on several record providers (e.g., Ancestry.com, FindMyPast.com, MyHeritage.com, etc.).

Many mistakes were made in census entries.  For instance, in the 1841 census, ages were rounded up to the next five years for adults, but not for children.  Many persons were not enumerated because the enumerator failed to call back or collect the form.  Name spelling errors are common.  Hal reviewed a list of why your ancestors may be missing from the census (e.g., they may not have been home, or working away from home, or travelling, very young infants were often not recorded, older children may be living outside the home, children of remarried widows may be listed under their stepfather's surname, enumerator handwriting may have been poor).

Hal showed a case study of Eliza (Horrocks) Mason, born in 1819  - starting  with the 1841 census, backtracking to find her baptism and marriage records in a Parish Register, then finding her in the 1851 to 1891 census records, and finding a death record in the Civil Registry.

All in all, this was an excellent review of how to find and use the British Parish Register and Census record resources.  


Saturday, August 23, 2014

Hal Horrocks is Presenter at 27 August CVGS Program Meeting

 WEDNESDAY, August 27th
 PROGRAM MEETING
from 12 noon to 2 p.m.
At Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library (365 F Street) Auditorium

Hal Horrocks: “British Research – Parish Registers and Census Records”


 Parish registers and census records are the core to British research. How to find and use them is the key to finding your English ancestors. All the basics necessary to effectively use them are covered.   

Learn the important dates necessary for proper British research and how they relate to church records and the census. Baptism, marriage and burial registers will be explored in detail with many examples given and also how to find them. The British census will be explored in detail from 1841 to 1911 with examples of each along with their anomalies. How to search the online census records will also be explained in detail. Finally, an example of tracing an individual through the census records from 1841 onward using only the information given in a will as the clue is shown using online resources.

 A native Californian and longtime Orange County California resident, Hal Horrocks is a professional genealogist, teacher, author and lecturer. He has been doing family research for 15 years and is a member of Association of Professional Genealogists (APG), Genealogical Speakers Guild (GSG), Orange County California Genealogical Society (OCCGS), Guild for One-Name Studies, Manchester & Lancashire Family History Society (UK), and Cheshire  Family History Society (UK). Hal is also the current President of OCCGS. He has written  articles for publication in both the U.S. and the U.K.

This meeting is free to attend.  There will be a short society business meeting before the presentation.  Snacks and drinks are provided by society members before and after the meeting.



Wednesday, August 20, 2014

August 20th Computer Group Review

The Chula Vista Genealogical Society (CVGS) Computer Group meeting on Wednesday, 20 August had 8 attendees.  Randy led this session since Shirley was just back from Utah and Gary was away on vacation.

The group visited three of Randy's favorite FREE websites:

1)  Find A Grave (www.findagrave.com) which has over 116 million entries.  Searching using names, birth/ death dates, and States/Counties was covered as was requesting photographs of gravestones (you have to be registered Find A Grave member).  Some memorial owners or photograph providers permit users to use their material with attribution or permission.  


2)  Google Books (http://books.google.com) which has millions of digitized books, many of which are out of copyright protection and can be downloaded as a PDF file or added to a user's "My Library" feature on Google.  Books that still have copyright protection are listed, but don't provide a full preview of the book and they cannot be downloaded.  

3)  Chronicling America (http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov) is a free digital newspaper website for the Library of Congress.  A user can determine which newspapers were published in a specific location (State/County/City) or can search, using keywords, the over 8 million newspaper pages available between 1836 and 1922.  Users can narrow their search by state and by year range.

Google Translate (http://translate.google.com) was also visited - useful for translating messages to or from one language to another for 82 languages from Afrikaans to Zulu.  This is very useful for translating genealogy information in books, periodicals, messages, and social media.

Lastly, there was a question about finding the population of a place in a historical time.  The suggestion was to look on Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org) for the place name and read the history of the city or county or state.  Many U.S. cities and counties have a list of population statistics from U.S. census records provided.  

The next Computer Group meeting will be Wednesday, 17 September 2014 in the Computer Lab at the Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library (365 F Street in downtown Chula Vista, Calif.).